Burping fish

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This topic contains 10 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Creek 1 month, 1 week ago.

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  • #7774

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    Hi guys. I have seen shows in the past where the angler would catch a respectable fish, like a good sized salmon, and he would rub the belly of the fish. I forgot why he was doing it, but it seemed important.

    My questions are obviously, what is he trying to get out of the fish?

    Should this be done always?

    Or is this only done with large fish, or playing the fish too long?

    #7775

    Creek
    Participant

    It’s called trout tickling. It’s used by poachers to put the trout in a trance. No net is needed.

    I have no idea why someone fishing legally and with a net would do it?

    #7776

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    No Creek. I mean before he releases the fish. I first noticed it on a show called King of the River, where the host rubs the belly of the Atlantic Salmon to get some kind of gas out of the fish that it builds up during the fight.
    I have seen others do it on t.v. before releasing big trout as well.

    #7777

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    I can’t find anything on it. But I think its a lactade gas they build up fighting to get off. It will kill the fish if not pushed out.

    #7778

    Creek
    Participant

    Probably more common with big fish like salmon. I’ll work the fish in the current if it’s been a hard fight to revive it, but I never rubbed it’s belly.

    #7779

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    I have a few episodes recorded. When I get back from Chihuahua this weekend I’ll watch them. I remember Andre, the host, explaining why he does that. So if I have that episode, I will post why.

    #7784

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    Haven’t heard of that one. I’ve never caught an Atlantic but have landed many hundreds of steelhead and Pacific salmon – IMO like any fish the key to C&R survival is landing them quickly and releasing them with a minimum of handling. Maybe I’m missing something but this technique sounds like the exact opposite of minimal handling.

    #7785

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    After bringing the fish in, he would always keep it in the water, that’s one of the things I admire about the host. He would just slide his hand back & forth to get this gas build up out of the fish. He said that it helps with the fish survival way after the release. I read that human during a vigorous workout also builds a lacto gas.
    He said many times after a hard fight the angler will just release the fish and it will swim off strong, only to die a few hours later because the angler didn’t push this gas out.

    It is very similar to what creek said about tickling the fish. I read up on that, but that is done for a different reason.

    #7786

    Creek
    Participant

    Trout also die after release from too much handling. It’s a delicate line of reviving but with not too much handling. We really don’t know if what we’re doing worked or not.

    This goes back to what I talked about in the past about keeping all the fish you catch. At least that would eliminate the problem of wasting a fish that died after release. It would also keep us from catching too many as there are limits you can catch and keep, but not C&R. It could be better conservation to keep them. It’s a subject that’s bothered me for years.

    I’d never shoot game without eating it, but may be killing fish for just my own pleasure and not know it.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  Creek.
    #7788

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    In mammals, lactic acid is a waste product produced by intense exercise. It builds up in the muscle tissue, causing fatigue and is removed by the oxygen in normal blood flow while at rest. Drinking a lot of water afterward is supposed to help flush the lactic acid from muscles as well. I would suppose it’s the same in fish after a hard fight. What they would need most is rest in well-oxygenated water.

    So the advice I always followed was to land a fish as quickly as possible (no, 7x is not more “sporting” dammit) keep it in the water (skip the #$@%& hero shots please!) and don’t C&R if the water is warm (less oxygen in warm water) Not sure how giving the fish a massage would do much good. I thought the idea was not to mess with the fish’s slime layer – that’s why we use rubber net bags instead of knotted cotton, right?

    I’d want to watch the video before forming an firm opinion on this.

    I’d never shoot game without eating it, but may be killing fish for just my own pleasure and not know it.

    Probably a few, but good C&R technique will minimize that. Since we rarely see dead fish I’d expect the overwhelming majority of released fish live. I know some Canadian salmon rivers have a limit on the number of fish one can land – either released or killed when you reach the limit you’re done for the day. Maybe not a bad idea on any heavily pressured river.

    #7789

    Creek
    Participant

    Not a bad idea at all. I like it.

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