feathers galore

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Scotty MacFly 7 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #7816

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    My order of hackle came in today, except for one cape I had to order from somewhere else, but all in all I am ready to sit my butt down in my chair and get down to some serious tying. Three packs of saddles and a half cape right now, and I have to make up some tying time before it’s time to hit the water, which will be sooner than normal this year.

    I’ll be tying my favorite of course, the Delaware Adams, plus flying ants, Griffiths Gnats, Renegades, and hopefully like I mentioned in a previous post, the Klinkhammer, plus a few other dries. And of course Spiders, and a few Prince Nymphs for my nephew.

    What do you guys have cooking at the vise?

    • This topic was modified 7 months, 3 weeks ago by  Scotty MacFly.
    #7818

    Creek
    Spectator

    Parachute Adams is my fly for 2018.

    #7819

    Grsdlnr
    Spectator

    Every year around this time I go through my flyboxes and take out all the ratty chewed-up ones – then take a razor to the hook if it can be saved for another fly. Very few wrecked flies to recycle this year (meaning I didn’t fish enough)

    As it stands now, I could go probably another year without tying anything for myself. I’ll get around to tying something of course – if for no other reason than out of boredom.

    #7820

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    GRS, I like the way you look at your amount of time fishing. If the flies ain’t torn up you didn’t fish enough.

    If you don’t mind I may adopt that philosophy.

    #7821

    Creek
    Spectator

    I’ll fish the same fly until it’s dead and then throw it away. So, if I have and Adams in size #10 to #18. Each size will be in a row. Only the first fly in the different rows will be chewed on. I have plenty of spares at home. If i’ve worn out a fly or two that day. I’ll replace it at night. So, my flybox always looks the same. Rows of flies with the first one in the row used.

    This is much easier to do when you don’t use a lot of different flies. It’s all part of me keeping everything simple. The only decision i’ll ever have all day is what size Adams to use. I always use the same type of furled leader with two different lengths for different waters. I use just two different size tippets according to fly size.

    99.9% of the time i’m thinking of presentation. It took a lot of years to come down to a system I like and just as long to make it simple. Fly fishing is better without constant decisions.

    #7822

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    I do like a little variety in my box. But never will my box look like some we all have seen in magazines & videos.

    I mostly only carry three different sizes, 14 thru 18, but there are some like a Griff’s Gnat where I still have three sizes, but I drop it a size pattern, 16 thru 20.

    But for the number of patterns, maybe 5 at most. And if none of those 5 patterns work, it’s spider time.

    #7823

    Creek
    Spectator

    Too easy to give up on a fly when you have others to go to. You waste time tying on flies instead of fishing. It took me awhile to realize this.

    #7826

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    Even though I love the Delaware Adams, I don’t think I could use only that fly, even in different sizes. Now that day I used it and caught my record number of fish, yes, that is all I used. If it aint broke, don’t fix it, right?

    But to use the same fly day after day, it would turn out to be monotonous. I don’t ever want to go fishing and look in my box and think to myself, Delaware Adams again?

    Besides, and I’m just speaking for myself, but using different flies builds my confidence in myself, not just as a fisherman, but a tyer as well. I could tie only one fly and become a master at that one fly, but I don’t see it doing me really any good. So ok, I can tie one fly really well, so what, is that the best I can do, sort of thing.

    They just moved my line at work to Mexico, and I was told just today that the only reason it did as well as it did here, was because of me. I don’t want to give myself any glory, but I was damn good at building that series of meters. Now that it’s gone, I am on another line, and I feel lost and not as good. It’s like starting over again after 20 years. And it’s kind of the same way with my tying flies. I’m not a master at it, but I don’t want to be limited to just one. But since my flies look decent, and they catch fish, I get that sense of some kind of accomplishment.

    At work I got in trouble because my boss said I can’t work through my breaks, and I can’t work more than 10 hours a day. Can’t, can’t, can’t. That’s all I have been hearing, and it’s limiting me of what I can accomplish. I like it better when I “can”. And I don’t want to lose that with anything that has to do with fishing. Oh I know I’ll never learn to tie 100 different flies, and I’m fine with that. But I can’t do just one. 😀

    #7827

    Creek
    Spectator

    Nobody asked you to use one fly Scotty. I’m telling you what I do. I’ve tied hundreds of different patterns over the years and fished them. I didn’t really like it. I was always changing flies instead of blaming what the problem really was……..poor presentation. I loved it when I cast the Adams and it doesn’t get a strike. In the past I would have changed the fly. Now, I work harder with presenting the Adams in different ways. It’s very satisfying to finally get the trout to take the Adams. So, was it the wrong fly to use? I don’t think so, because the trout finally took it. Had I changed flies right away I never would have known that. I would have given up on the Adams and I don’t ever like to give up on anything.

    Now, if it’s impossible to catch the fish i’m working on with an Adams. I simply move to a new spot and catch a different fish. Changing the fly is never am option. I’ve always felt that changing flies all the time just meant I didn’t know what fly to use. It’s too easy to keep changing the flies until you find one that works. What does that prove? What satisfaction can that bring? None for me.

    I never get bored with using one fly. The challenge and excitement is getting it to work all the time. Over time i’ve gotten better at making it work. I’ll bet i’m down to 1% of the time I can’t get it to work now.

    I also hunt in a difficult manner. I love to challenge myself. My dad taught me that if something is too easy, it’s not worth doing. He was right.

    #7828

    Grsdlnr
    Spectator

    Creek, I admire your discipline and persistence. I think you’d agree that you’re fortunate to live near streams where such an approach pays off. In my experience with hard-fished tailwaters and spring creeks there are times where it wouldn’t. These are trout that have seen it all, and while they are trout (and therefore stupid compared to us) they do get into patterns of feeding that don’t respond to the one-fly approach. And the water is often too crowded to easily move on to a new fish.

    #7829

    Creek
    Spectator

    Yes, that’s very true. I pretty much will fish waters and time of year when I have the best chance of my fly working. I’m also not always trying to imitate a mayfly. A size#10 Adams can look like a hopper during the right time. During a caddis hatch I may snip off the tail of the Adams to look more like a caddis. A size #20 can catch fish during a midge hatch.

    This year i’m switching to the Parachute Adams. A different profile and certainly easier to see will be interesting. It’s gotten too hard to see an Adams in certain lighting.

    Our tailwaters are more nymph waters. So, i’ll go downstream where it’s more like a freestone stream and the Adams will work. Plus, it’s not crowded if being used at all. This is typical of the Frying Pan and Taylor.

    So, yes if someone is going to use one fly they can’t be stubborn or stu[id about it. Adjustments are needed.

    #7830

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    I got you creek, I understand. And I know no one was telling me to use one fly. It’s just my way of making myself better FOR myself and no one else. Just a personal thing I guess you can say.

    But I do wish at times that I could use one fly and stick with it. I see your point on making the fly work by working on the presentation. And you are 100% right, presentation is the key.

    Remember that study I did, comparing flies on the water two years ago? That was fun for me. The Delaware took the prize in the long run, but the ant was a little better later in the season, but just not as good all around. Even though I’m serious about my fishing, I have to remember that I’m playing too. It could be a windy, snowy, rainy, day from hell, and even though I’d hate the elements, I’m still going to have fun.

    I still plan on doing my fly challenge again this year but this does not include spiders because they are in a different league. I just don’t know which fly to pick to challenge the others, which means the Delaware may sit out this year. Naw, I’ll still fish it from time to time. Maybe I will choose the Renegade as the fly to challenge? It does well here in the waters I fish, especially in the smaller waters. But there is a new fly on the list that is similar to the Renegade, the John Storey dry fly. This could be an interesting match up. And the John Storey has a great story on how it came to be. Here’s the fly and the story.
    http://globalflyfisher.com/video/john-storey-dry-fly

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