Fine wire hooks

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Creek 3 weeks, 6 days ago.

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  • #7521

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    How many of you use them?
    I have a hard time putting faith in them because any hook I can bend while tying a fly will surely straighten out playing a fish.

    I know the light weight hooks will float nicely once dressed in feathers. But since creek turned me onto Partridge hooks I have been very happy.

    Now, I see the same company that makes Partridge hooks makes Gaelic Supreme hooks. They look as though they are a little heavier guaged hook than Partridge. They have a section of dry fly hooks, and the eyes are slightly turned up, not down as I usually see. Must be a reason for that.

    Are any of you familiar with these hooks? And I’m wondering if they’d be worth a try being a what looks like a heavier hook?

    #7523

    Creek
    Participant

    The light hooks might not be the best choice if you think you’ll be catching some hogs. If used for the spiders the flies don’t get that small, so the lighter hooks should be ok. I’ve never opened one catching the hogs on the Taylor. Although those fish are smart and know to drag the tippet across the big boulders and break off. It takes some luck to land those smart asses.

    #7526

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    Umpqua sells some really finely guaged hooks, and the guys at the local shop suggested to me to buy some. But when I tie flies with them, I’d bend the hook. I’m sure they’d be good for small brookies and such, but I really don’t see how I can have confidence in them.

    I do really like the Partidge hooks. Very strong and sharp. Just looking at one and you see nothing but quality. I see that Dette fly shop sells them, so I guess I can order a pack and see for myself now.

    I guess what I’m wondering is how heavy of a hook ( a dry fly hook ) should one go? Will a heavier dry fly hook stay afloat in riffles, or fast pocket water? That’s what I’m trying to figure.

    But Like I said, Partridge is all I tie with now, but having the eye rise up may help a person like myself who wears glasses to tie the fly on easier instead of one where the eye is bent down and fibers getting in the way like they do sometimes. The eye would be above the head of the fly.

    https://www.detteflies.com/catalog/86

    #7527

    Creek
    Participant

    As long as it’s listed as a dry fly hook you should be ok. All you can do is try them and see. Tie them extra bushy. :)

    #7529

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    Haven’t had a hook straighten on a fish since I quit using 2X light wire Mustad 94833’s in the 80’s – and only then in the smallest sizes, like 20’s. Mustad’s reportedly solved the quality issues with their newer hooks.

    I settled on Daiichi 1110 (ring-eye, wide gape) for my dries a long time ago (bought boxes of 1000 for the most used sizes!) and never looked back.

    #7530

    Creek
    Participant

    I have friends who do it now and then, but they’re from the fast rod crowd. I think the stiffer rods and the ungentle fighting of the fish is the problem. Way too much bend in my rods to straighten a hook. Plus, I never use small flies. I can’t see the little buggers.

    #7531

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    I never thought about fast rods contributing to bent hooks. Broken tippet, yes, but not bent hooks.

    I my contact Gaelic Supreme & ask why the upward bend to the eye. That is new to me.

    I come home tomorrow, so I’ll do it this weekend.

    #7532

    Creek
    Participant

    When they get tired of breaking off tippet with their fast rods they increase the tippet size until it stops breaking. Then the hooks start to open up on the small size flies they insist on using.

    #7533

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    Really? Ha ha ha. And I thought I was stupid. 😀

    #7534

    Creek
    Participant

    I’ll be fishing next to them using a size#14 dry and they’ll be using size #20-22. I’m catching just as many fish and more at times, but they insist on telling me the fish want small flies.

    I just smile and land another one on my #14, while they curse they can’t see their fly. I’ll say I can’t see their fly either. Then i’ll say………..can you see mine? They say sure that’s easy. They never get it.

    #7535

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    I very rarely go smaller than 18, 20 being the absolute smallest. I have learned this year that its better to fish a fly that you can see in faster water than one you can’t see. If I fish a pool or somewhere where the water isn’t turbulant, then I will go smaller if the bigger flies don’t work.

    #7536

    Creek
    Participant

    I just keep using the big flies until I convince the fish that that’s what they want. It takes patience and creative casting. Convince the fish it’s a hatch. They might be looking for a smaller fly, but they’ve taken the bigger fly at some time in their life. If they’re hungry and I can make the big fly look tempting. They’ll give in.

    A true dry fly fisherman will find a way to change a trouts mind in what it wants. The degree that you’re a dry fly fisherman is how long you stay with a fly before going to something new. I’m as stubborn as they come. I’ll never change a fly. That just wastes time I should have a fly on the water. I can’t convince the trout a hatch in on if I have gaps in-between changing flies.

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