Going back

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This topic contains 122 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Creek 1 month, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #5767

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    Spring time in the Rockies will be here soon enough, so I have slowly been tying dries and spiders. I have been thinking a lot for the last month about how I’m going to do things this year, and the years to come.

    Creek, the last thing you replied to me was to keep it simple. Well, this last month I started working on it. I have decided to fish the small waters after runoff, and fish the bigger before runoff and after the rafting season. I have been reading W.C. Stewarts ” The Practical Angler ” and have been enjoying it very much as I read his take on things, because now I understand where my grandpa was coming from. I really like the part where he talks about fly rods and what they were made of back then. It was a great purchase because it’s fitting in to what I want to do.

    I am a member of the NAFFF, but for the last six months or so, it has been the same thing over and over. There have been some really good posts, but there are so many people there, it repeats itself regularly. And it seems at least to me that fly fishing is somewhat becoming commercialized with all the new rods out this year and other gear. I’m all for improvements, but this is too much for me. I was starting to get pulled into having the latest and greatest toys, and reading posts and articles on other methods on fishing and different techniques for tough casts, for example; using muscle memory for difficult casts. Now I may not understand what the writer of that article was really trying to say, but to me it seems as if some articles out there are so full of bovine. To me they are making this sport more difficult than what it should be. But then again, what do I know? I know I don’t want to worry about that stuff, or what the newest thing is from the manufacturers. I was an average C- student when it came to science class, and that hasn’t changed. I’m not against science, and paying attention on the water to what the fish are doing does pay off, but knowing the chemical make up of fly line and such, I’m sorry, but I don’t care. I just want to fish. They can keep their $1000 graphite rods, I don’t need one, and to me, they’re over priced. I don’t care how another fishes, because he isn’t fishing for me, and I am not for him. I was getting overwhelmed by all of it, and I don’t like it.

    So last night I said good-bye on the NAFFF, and I want to leave everything behind and fish the way my grandpa fished and not give a damn what the rest of the world is doing. I want to stick with things that are closer to what I like, and this forum is what I like. It’s small, but I believe that’s not really a bad thing. I have seen new members join here and disappear in two weeks, probably because this forum isn’t as clustered as the others. I like it here. I like fishing dries, and feel I have a closer….I want to say, relationship, with you guys. This is the Dry Fly Forum, and I love fishing dries. But I know other ways are excepted here and I’m good with that because it’s not too much. I wish there was a forum on fishing Spiders, I’d jump on that as well. I do from time to time visit the Classic Fly Rod Forum, but those folks are in a higher league than I. Sometimes I don’t understand what they are saying, especially when it comes to rods. I wouldn’t know a Dickerson taper from a Payne. I am familiar with the names, but that’s all. I just learned for example what a 763 2/3 would mean. I enjoy the Fiberglass forum, but I don’t get on it as much anymore.

    I like this forum, and I want to stay as long as I am welcome.

    So I’m going back to my beginnings, and let me tell you, it’s liberating. Fishing is supposed to take us away from the worries and stress that the world seems to only offer us, and it’s meant to be fun. And that should always be first, because if it wasn’t fun, why would we do it in the first place except maybe for necessary reasons.

    So if you’re as fed up with all the must haves and feeling closed in with all the advice from magazine articles on the same subjects but different techniques on how to sink your flies to get to deep holding fish, my advice is to just let it all go, and go back to your beginning.

    So, come on in, the water’s fine.

    #5768

    wheezeburnt
    Participant

    Well said, Scotty.

    #5769

    Creek
    Participant

    If you go on the Classic forum Scotty. Did you see this?

    http://classicflyrodforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=65&t=102530

    Yes, i’m BambooNut. You wouldn’t believe how many PM’s I got on this encouraging me.

    #5770

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    No Creek, I didn’t see it, but the last time I was on there it was about three weeks ago.

    O.K., I see you posted it on the 26th of this month, so it would not have been there. I think it’s fantastic that you’re doing that. I’d be very interested how it works for you for a year. I’m behind you on it all the way.

    I won’t be dismissing dries at all, but I am only going to fish upstream like what Oliver Edwards shows on that video of wet fly fishing, how he talks about what W.C. Stewart said in his book. I’m a bout a quarter way through it now, but finding myself re-reading areas because he uses words I’m not familiar with, so it’s hard sometimes for me to understand what he is saying, but I’m understanding it enough that I am pulled into it. He was a well educated person, and it shows it in how beautifully written his book is. I’m lucky just to graduate high school. So no fancy words coming from me, ha ha.

    I’m just tired of using different techniques even though I’m using dries. All these styles I’ve been reading just doesn’t make sense, like giving your dry fly small jerks ACROSS the current seams to imitate a struggling insect trying to take off. Really??? I know caddis will skip and flutter a little, but not like that. Or do they, because I have never seen one skip across an entire river. Just a few skips and they’re off is all I’ve seen.

    No, I have not been happy, at least as happy as I have been. What makes me happy is when someone comes along and see’s me fishing fast turbulent water and they see me picking the small soft spots and they say there wouldn’t be any fish there, but then before you now it, fish on. That shuts them up real quick. I am going back to my roots, the way my grandpa showed me, and apparently he must have learned it from Mr. Stewart.

    After this year, we should post on our success. Just to see if there is a big difference between us. Then we can compare what / how we did, and get better on the areas that need improving. Well, I’m sure I could use some improving.

    But I have been thinking about this since Christmas, and I can’t wait to get started. That’s one of the reasons I got Mr. Stewart’s book. I heard so much about it, and I felt a strong urge to read it. I see there is another book on dry fly fishing that is old as well from another person across the pond. I don’t remember the title right now, but I saw it mentioned on this forum. I’m interested in that book as well.

    Go with the spiders Creek, and have fun. Just have fun.

    #5771

    Creek
    Participant

    I’m actually reading Stewart’s book for the 3rd time. Just to make sure it all soaks in. I’m even considering restricting my spider choice to his three flies just to see they really are all we need like he recommends.

    When you’re done reading Stewart’s book i’ll give you some links to read some others online. I stopped buying the old books because they’re all available to read online. With my lousy vision, I find it more comfortable reading on my computer than a book.

    Welcome to the simple is better club. :)

    #5772

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    You know, the one thing so far that surprised me in the book was Mr. Stewart said he prefers fast rods. And the reason is the timing it takes between the flick of the wrist and the setting of the hook with a slower rod takes a little longer than with the faster rod. True. I have experienced that myself. But learning that way back then they had different actions as well was interesting. But I wonder if their fast rods are as fast as the rods we have today. I’m sure there are close comparisons but Sage wasn’t around back then. No offence to any Sage fans. But when setting the hook with my med/fast rods I actually wait a second and say to myself something like fish on or praise God, and then set the hook. Just long enough to let the fish turn with the fly. With a softer rod I add another syllable, or count to three. I has helped me very much.

    But anyway, this book is like hearing my grandpa and having him back again. I love it. I new if I looked back in time I’d rekindle some things I have forgotten, and learn more about the style I like the most.

    Yes Creek, I’d be interested in those books online. But no more modern stuff. Though I have to say that not all the modern ideas I have read have been bad. There was an article in a magazine about matching the flies ( talking of dries ) with the seasons as in, if you use three flies at once, each fly should be known for that time of the year. So you don’t want to put on a grass hopper with an ant and an Adams in early spring. Something like that.

    #5773

    Creek
    Participant

    Then rods in Stewarts time were 12-15′ long and made out of greenhart wood. Probably weighed 10lbs. How fast do you think it was and how fast do you think you could set a hook with it. I’m sure the rod and set were pretty slow. It’s all relative. My rod will be a cane rod with a med-fast action. That’s like a med action graphite rod. Sage rods are ridiculous and are way too fast for trout fishing. All they can do is cast a long line. Something i’ve never found a need for.

    Matching flies to a season has been done for hundreds of years. It’s not anything new even if you read it in a modern book. All the spider flies have a season they should be fished.

    I’ll get you a link to a book by Pritt that’s about spiders and you’ll see it has the month they should be fished.

    Meanwhile, if you want to read Stewart’s book online. Here’s the link.

    http://www.archive.org/stream/anglerpractical00stewrich#page/n3/mode/2up

    #5774

    Creek
    Participant
    #5775

    Creek
    Participant

    If you want to read a modern book on spiders. Here’s a good one, but you’ll have to buy it. Author is a Brit and really into the history. I’m about half way through it.

    “Wet Fly Tying and Fishing” by Roger Fogg

    #5776

    Creek
    Participant

    One more if you want to read about dry flies by the man who gets the credit for starting it all. I’ve read this one a gazillion times.

    https://archive.org/stream/dryflyfishingint00half#page/n0/mode/2up

    #5777

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    Thanks for all the links Creek. What a great way to get through the winter blahs.

    Scotty – yer preaching to the choir my friend. We few, we happy few… :)

    #5778

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    I knew I chose the right forum to stay with.

    Thanks for the links Creek. And thanks everyone for the support.

    #5779

    Creek
    Participant

    Scotty………….If you want to fish three flies and not get any tangles. Here’s a way to tie them that’s different. This is made by my friend in the UK. Real nice guy. He teaches fishing spiders and sells the flies. He’s very picky about doing it the right traditional way. We’ve had some long conversations.

    #5780

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    Thanks Creek. I want to ask if the hook being that close to the main line, will it stop the fish from taking it because with a small tag the fly is away from the main line, as in the tippet or leader. But I guess it wouldn’t. I did hear what my problem is, I need to separate my flies more when fishing faster water. I have been keeping them about 18 inches and not 3ft. Also, I need to stop false casting so much & just pick the line up and lay it down instead. Who really needs to false cast with 20ft. of line out of the tip anyway. Oh, that would have been me.

    #5781

    Creek
    Participant

    Here’s a video of the chalk streams of Hampshire. It’s about how the streams were developed and about the dry fly and it’s pioneers. If you like history you’ll like this, but a must see for dry fly fisherman. Although it does show some nymphing at the end. I always though nymphing wasn’t allowed on the River Test, but that for just certain beats.

    Anyway, here it is. It’s kind of long, but worth a watch.

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