Hot spots

The Forum is Closed. Forums The Hatch Hot spots

This topic contains 18 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Creek 6 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #7745

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    Hey guys, as you know I tie nymphs for my son and nephew, and many of them get a red collar for a hot spot.

    Are you thinking what I’m thinking? Do you think a hot spot would benefit being on a dry fly? I think under the right circumstance it may, like maybe in dingy water, but I don’t know.

    What do you guys think? is it worth a try, or a waste of time?

    #7746

    Grsdlnr
    Spectator

    Of course it’s worth a try.

    My own experience is that color on a dry is the least important factor – size and silhouette are vital, but
    I’ve have caught plenty of fish during a hatch with the “wrong” color fly (like an Adams taken for a Hendrickson, the males are reddish brown and the females a pinkish tan – neither one close to medium gray) But we have little information on how a fish really sees color, so go for it – no experiment is a failure if you learn something.

    #7747

    Creek
    Spectator

    LOL…An Adams works for all mayflies. Just use different sizes. From midges to green drakes i’m using an Adams. Want to fish a caddis hatch? Snip the tail off an Adams. 😀

    I carry one fly box.Guess what it’s full of?

    Scotty….Female flies have a hot spot on their butt. Good for evening fishing when the females are dropping eggs.

    #7748

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    I didn’t know about the females having a hot butt till today. 😀

    Hatches were another thing I didn’t think of. I was only thinking about water conditions. Man, I’m a shallow thinker.

    Maybe I have seen flies that represented the females & never paid attention. Could be I thought that’s just how the person ties them & didn’t think more on it. But with my ignorance, how am I to know?

    Would the red or yellow belly on a Humpy be considered a hot spot?

    #7749

    Creek
    Spectator

    Here’s a caddis. I just did a quick look. Research will bring you much more.

    http://www.flytierspage.com/mruoff/cdc_female_caddis.htm

    Here are some Adams females.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=female+adams+fly&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiJlu6esbzYAhUK1WMKHQvPAXAQsAQIYw&biw=1097&bih=542

    • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by  Creek.
    #7751

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    So the yellow butt section is the egg sack?

    Ok then. I never saw one in the wild before, or just never noticed. All I get crawling on me are spiders. I hate spiders. Except for the ones I tie.

    My grandfather always fished with dark flies. He’d say flies are dark, mosquitos are fairly dark, spiders are dark and so on. Then he’d challenge me to come up with bright colored bugs, and all I’d come up with was a praying mantis, being bright green. I also thought of a Lady Bug, but he said they are dark on the belly side, and that’s what the trout see is the underneath side of a bug. Maybe that’s why I don’t get into brightly tied flies. Some beetles can get bright I guess.

    #7752

    Creek
    Spectator

    You should have shown him a PMD. Maybe a Yellow Sally too. I could come up with lots, but those are examples.

    A hot spot for an egg sack isn’t a bright fly though. It is realistic and the fish do key on it in the evening when the real fly is on the water.

    • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by  Creek.
    #7754

    Grsdlnr
    Spectator

    Hatches were another thing I didn’t think of. I was only thinking about water conditions.

    And I wasn’t really thinking of attractor type flies. Where the idea is to get the fish to notice the fly in the first place, and maybe a bright spot of non-buggy color is just the ticket. You could certainly do it as an egg sac like the Female Adams or something else. I know George Harvey went to bright yellow or orange poly wings instead of wood duck flank on his Catskill type dries for visibility as he got older, and said that the trout didn’t notice the difference.

    I always figured that a fish sees the floating fly basically as a silhouette against the bright sky so color isn’t usually important (usually!) That’s why we catch so many fish on an Adams, even if the real bugs are tan or green or whatever.

    #7755

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    GRS, if the trout doesn’t notice, then why even add a bright color? My grandfather would agree with you that a dry is only a silhouette, but he believed no matter what color the bugs were, they looked similar in color from below, with some small differences depending on the brightness of the color. He said something like, and I may be wrong on this, but looking at a fly in a glass of water from the bottom of the glass, like a trout looking up to the fly, is different than the same fly floating on the surface of the stream, because of the lighting plus the shadows, and clarity of the water.

    #7756

    The_bat_fly
    Spectator

    I always thought that they just saw the shadow and the ripple it’s interesting that they can see some color.

    #7757

    Creek
    Spectator

    Scotty……..As GRS he said. Bright wings are added so the fisherman can see the fly. I started to do that myself as my vision gets worse.

    I never thought the color was important or I wouldn’t fish the Adams so much. When you can catch fish during a PMD hatch on an Adams you learn colors aren’t important. Size and silhouette are what the trout are looking at and i’m not so sure about silhouette lately.

    I’m sort of down to size and presentation now. The year I fished nothing but an Adams in size #10-#20 and caught just as many fish as boxes of flies opened my thoughts. I’m thinking an Adams with bright wings might be the perfect fly for me to retire with. Present it properly and in the right size and you’ll have success.

    I know I said I was going to fish Spiders this year, but my heart is with dries and especially the Adams. There’s no way I could stay away a whole year. Follow your heart and you’ll be happy.

    I’m going to start working on my bright winged Adams today. I’ll have all I need for the year by spring. I don’t like to tie flies during fishing season. I get it all done in the winter, so I need to decide what i’m going to tie now and I have.

    #7758

    Grsdlnr
    Spectator

    … if the trout doesn’t notice, then why even add a bright color?

    Maybe they do – all the research I’ve read says that trout can see color, but HOW they see color is still a question. It’s possible their vision is more affected by UV and other parts of the spectrum we can’t see – to my knowledge nobody can say for certain. So maybe, at least in some circumstances, color on a dry can make a difference.

    Or perhaps we humans just fish more effectively with a fly we find attractive than one we find dull?

    #7759

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    The color spectrum under water is different. I red articles how for example blues & blacks & purples will stay pretty much the same as a lure gets deeper. Red & orange stay that color pretty shallow, but change as a red or orange lure gets deeper.

    So fish can see color, but what I’m getting is, its not so much the wings or posts that a fish cares about color wise, because they see the bottom of the fly, so shape & size is what’s important. So really a hot spot on a dry isn’t needed, but it doesn’t hurt either. Wings & posts brightly colored are for our benefit of seeing the fly.

    Ok, I’m starting to get it & understand.

    #7760

    Creek
    Spectator

    Why wouldn’t a hot spot matter. The fish can see that. It’s not like a wing. They may not see exactly what color the hot spot is, but they can see a different shade. They might put that together with a female laying eggs and it looks familiar to them. So, they strike.

    Deer and elk see everything in a pale yellow, but they see shades and patterns.

    #7764

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    I’m going to tie a few when I get back from Mexico. I figured I’d tie a hot spot at the tail end on some, and on others at the head. I may even tie a hot spot right behind the hackle collar.

    I figure why not, what could it hurt?

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