Mutilated flies

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Scotty MacFly 7 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #7868

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    I have a feeling I know the answer to this, but how many of you ever fished a fly until it was so torn up that it was unrecognizable, and it still caught fish?

    I have done this with a Renegade, and an Adams, where everything was coming apart, but it was still producing hits, so I just kept using it.

    This now makes me wonder, are we over tying our flies, just for the sake of looks in our eyes? Apparently we could get away with less material on our flies, according to the fish I suppose.

    #7869

    Grsdlnr
    Spectator

    Not often. Usually with either freshly stocked trout or bluegills. Haven’t fished for stockers in ages, and the only bluegills around here are severely stunted (like 3″!) and hold zero appeal.

    I carry so many (too many?) flies – it’s no big deal to switch to a fresh one on those all too rare occasions where wild fish are “on” to the extent they destroy my bug.

    #7870

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    To be honest, I kept using it because: 1, it was still working. 2, I was too lazy to change the thing. Hey, if it aint broke, don’t fix it, right?
    But it just got me to thinking, and if I remember right, W.C. Stewart talked about less dressing on flies.

    So it has me curious about using less material on some of my flies, but maybe add an extra wrap of thread for insurance.

    #7871

    Grsdlnr
    Spectator

    Yes, you have a point there – most flies I see for sale are overdressed. Less really is more.

    #7872

    Creek
    Spectator

    Keep in mind Scotty that Stewart was talking about spiders. A sparse fly that is fished sub surface.

    An Adams is tied full because you want it to float. In our case float on faster moving water. So, if you lose too much of it, it won’t float as good. For that reason, I don’t normally use a fly once it starts to come apart. I always have plenty of backups.

    When I was fishing nymphs i’d do what you’re talking about. Sometimes i’d just have a little thread left on the hook and it still caught fish.

    #7873

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    You’re right creek, it was spiders. For some reason I thought I remembered him talking of flies in general. Thanks for clearing that up.

    Nymphs, yes, I can definitely see your point there.

    I was just getting a little laugh that sometimes dry fly fishing my flies would get so tattered, and still float with just a bit of hackle left on, that the fish would take it. Then I see the Tenkara flies and how minimal the dressing is on them, and even though they sit differently in the water, I have to wonder if my flies were sitting the same way. It’s possible I suppose that they were, but watching my poor little abused fly barely floating along the surface and still taking fish. I just found it amusing in a way, then dang it, it got me thinking about the dressing.

    In fast turbulant water or pocket water with many rocks, I can see a full dressing. But maybe that’s why wet flies like spiders and others work better for me in smoother not so fast waters. Like right below riffles or at the head of pools.

    #7874

    Creek
    Spectator

    I agree we probably tie them a bit heavy, but they look purdy that way. 😀

    #7875

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    Yeah, they do, don’t they? Artwork on a hook.

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