Natures floatant or sink

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This topic contains 12 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  wheezeburnt 1 year, 4 months ago.

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  • #5311

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    OK, you all may laugh at me, shake your heads in disbelief, because I’m probably the only one to ever ask this. And even though it may be legal in Colorado to smoke it, I promise you, and swear on my Bible I have never touched the stuff, but here it goes. You may want to sit down.

    Pine sap, do you think it would make a good floatant, or sink?

    I was fishing yesterday and grabbed on to a pine tree and my line hand got sticky. Believe me, it’s not easy shooting line through your hand with pine sap. I then accidently got a little on my tippet, and I’m not sure, but I think it kind of acted like a degreaser and took the tippet just under the surface. I was trying to wash it off my hand, and it’s not easy with just water, then I thought that maybe it would be a good, sticky, but good floatant for those times you run out.

    Colorado University did a study years ago on tree sap and largemouth bass. They said that large Mouth bass moved away from X-mas trees dumped in piles in a local reservoir. Fish like structure, so they found that the scent from the pine sap kept bass away. I don’t know how it would affect trout. I believe it wouldn’t bother them because I have caught trout on the downstream side of a pine tree that has fallen in the river.

    So when you’re done laughing and asking how in the world was I allowed to join this forum, I’d like some of your thoughts.

    #5312

    Creek
    Participant

    No comment.

    #5313

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    It was one of those days, I swear.

    #5325

    Dry Fly Guy
    Keymaster

    Too funny Scotty.

    Why don’t you do some field trials and report back. šŸ˜‰

    ~ DFG

    #5327

    wheezeburnt
    Participant

    I could see pine sap making a pretty good (albeit slow drying) head cement…..
    but in truth, most Christmas trees in Colorado (and most places) are ‘fir’ species, not pines (although some pines are used) so likely, if the bass were shying away from Christmas tree structure, they were reacting to the genus ‘Abies”, not “Pinus”.
    brent

    #5329

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    Here’s what I was thinking. They use sap to get metals out of ore. What I have learned is they will heat the sap ( being a tar ) and place the ore in it. The metals soon get extracted from the ore after different processes. They skim off the top layer of whatever they are trying to produce if I remember right, but I could be wrong on that.

    So I thought that maybe if I collect enough sap to heat up to a liquid, I can either use what comes to the top after skimming it off, or, use what’s below it. I figure what comes to the surface should be like an oil base substance that’ll float.

    Now, my average grade in science was a C. So maybe I’m just thinking up a fantastical unreal idea, or maybe I’m onto something. I don’t know.

    Like I said, it was just one of those days.

    Wheezeburnt, thank you for clearing that up for me.

    #5330

    wheezeburnt
    Participant

    Scotty: I think you’ve moved into the realm of alchemy, but I’m a firm believer that just because no one thought to do it, it doesn’t make it a bad idea. Just be careful: some tree saps contain terpenes (especially conifers) and terpenes can be very flammable. sounds like a good way for a lad to lose his eyebrows (or more).
    Ore extraction using sap? Can’t say I’ve ever heard of that.
    brent

    #5331

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    I was told about the extraction with ore by a co-worker who used to do that sort of thing. He said they used different vats for extracting out different metals. He didn’t get into details. Now, I forgot about sap being flammable. Maybe this isn’t such a wise thing to do. Think I’ll stay with my store bought floatant. Thanks for the warning.

    #5332

    wheezeburnt
    Participant

    Hey, speaking of natural fly fishing products, I recall about two decades ago being at a fly tying meeting where one of the older and more crusty instructors showed a group of aghast yuppies how he could use belly button lint and earwax to dub a dryfly body. He offered the completed fly to the group: no takers. I had to scrap the fly I was tying because I’d snorted coffee all over it.
    brent

    #5333

    Creek
    Participant

    Sounds ok to me. I would have taken the fly. Was it an Adams? šŸ˜€

    #5334

    wheezeburnt
    Participant

    Why, yes it was!!! As luck would have it, he’d been wearing a medium gray wool sweater (likely for days…). I’m not sure how much the students at his table remember from that class, but I’m danged sure they remembered THAT.
    I think a related lesson is: when you trim your finger nails for fly tying, always leave the baby finger a little bit long.
    brent

    #5335

    Creek
    Participant

    I tried to tie one up, but fell short of BB lint. I should have tied a smaller Adams.

    Anybody seen my grey sweater?

    #5336

    wheezeburnt
    Participant

    lol!

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