New Fly Lines

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This topic contains 21 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Scotty MacFly 2 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #7117

    Creek
    Participant

    Check out these dry fly lines Scotty. I kind of brushed them aside at first, but the more I check them out the more interesting they get.

    https://sunrayflyfish.com/collections/fly-lines

    #7121

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    Hmmmm. A thinner pvc line would go through the line guides easier, that’s for sure. I read a few of the reviews and all were positive, but I have found you can’t rely on those 100%. But I did read some of the questions and they said the Stuart line for dry fly is intended for bamboo.

    At 70 in British pounds, that would be $93 US.

    Priced in the same ball park as Rio & Scientific Angler lines.

    I don’t see anything that gives me a red light. I see yellow, because I tend to be cautious about products I’m unfamiliar with. But maybe this line is as good as the reviews say.

    Are you going to order a box creek? If you are, let me know what you think. I know you don’t much care for the Airflo products, but I am stuck on them with my graphite rods. I still have the Cortland Peach on the bamboo and see no reason to change that line. I like it.

    #7129

    Creek
    Participant

    It’s not a PVC line Scotty. It’s fluoro coated mono. I have to save for the rod, so I won’t be ordering it for a while if at all. It’s half the price of silk and i’d hate to waste half the price of a silk line if I don’t like it. It got good reviews on the bamboo forum. So, you never know. I want to see more reviews. What i’m confused about is it’s a light line and I don’t see how it will load the rod if it doesn’t have the weight to do it.

    #7143

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    Just read some more. I see where it said a fluoro coated mono. Thought I saw it say a pvc, but maybe I saw something else or someone comparing it to pvc.

    I see that it’s good for rods over 9ft. in length, and in the reviews, many have 10ft. rods, and using it for nymphing. I think maybe 95% of the people reviewing the lines live in GB or Europe. Hmf, nymphers.

    I’m going to wait. I like what I have now, but I will definitely keep an eye out for further reviews. I like how it says it lays down with little to no ripple effect on the water, and lifting it off there is little spray.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  Scotty MacFly.
    #7157

    Creek
    Participant

    There’s a dry fly line for over 9′ rods and another one for under 9′ rods.

    #7158

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    How does something like that work? Specific lines for specific rod lengths.

    I’m guessing it has to be the head length and taper design.

    #7160

    Creek
    Participant

    Yes, length of taper which is just bull.

    #7161

    Creek
    Participant
    #7162

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    Good review. I also read the questions people had, and one thing got my attention.

    Thicker line is more buoyant on broken water than thinner line. The guy Tom does agree with that.
    Now, I am wondering how well it will float in the turbulent waters I fish?

    I may just contact them when I get home and ask. Also, how about maintaining the line? I saw nothing about cleaning it or having to add a dressing to it.

    #7163

    Creek
    Participant

    I do believe the line was made for Chalk Stream type fishing and it may not do well in fast water without treating it. Silk lines are treated, so they do well in all waters.

    My biggest concern is the light weight of the line. That will work with enough line out, but will it work up close?

    I don’t see it having an advantage over silk, except in cold weather. Silk stiffens up in cold weather and get too much memory. Then again in my old age, I stiffen up too and don’t fish cold weather anymore.

    If I had a lot of money i’d buy the line just to try it, but that’s not the case. I’d rather put the money towards a silk line. I know they work.

    #7166

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    They said the line is lighter, but more dense than typical fly line. Its the being more dense of a line that helps load the rod. I saw a few people wonder the same thing on how it can load being so light and that was the reply they got back.

    Ok, so the line casts great. Whoopie! If I was a competitive caster I’d jump on it.

    I need a line that will fish.

    #7167

    Creek
    Participant

    Dense can affect how it floats. The only thing that loads a rod is the weight.

    What overloads a rod. A line too heavy right? What underloads it? A line too light.

    I’m not going for their answer.

    #7170

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    That special coating they put on it makes it float. I don’t remember what its called.
    I don’t know. The more I think about it, the more I lose interest in it.

    #7171

    Creek
    Participant

    It floats from the air bubbles put in it like pvc lines. Only silk lines don’t do that, because they’re solid, dense, and use floatant. That’s why a silk line can be a small diameter but still float better than any other line.

    I think you missed my last post in the Old School thread.

    #7173

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    No, I got the point, and understand the silk thing. Being a natural material being solid it would be dense. So it does take floating to keep it afloat.

    The fly line we are looking at is a denser material with a special thin outer coating to help it float. I couldn’t pronounce the word they used, so that’s why I don’t remember it. I will try to find the word.

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