Question on silk

The Forum is Closed. Forums The Hatch Question on silk

This topic contains 9 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Grsdlnr 4 weeks, 1 day ago.

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  • #7958

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    So, for silk fly lines you must dry them out before storing the line away or it will rot, am I correct?

    If that’s true, what about silk thread on flies? Will the fly fall apart after awhile because of the silk rotting?

    I thought I’d ask because I was just ordering some silk thread and for some reason this question popped in my head.

    On the other side, I read that Ultra Thread is a good substitute for silk thread. What are your thoughts on that?

    #7959

    Creek
    Spectator

    A silk line is covered up by being wound on a reel. It doesn’t take long for a silk line to dry if taken off the reel and exposed to air. I used to do it while eating lunch. I would take it off the reel and hang it in big loops on a bush. Eat lunch and spool line back on the reel while applying some floatant.

    Your flies tied with silk are drying very fast. Before you even get home from fishing.

    #7960

    Creek
    Spectator

    One of the reasons for using silk is the color they turn when wet. You never look at a spider to check colors when the thread is dry. Always when they’re wet. Spiders all look pretty much alike if you take colors out of the picture, so colors are very important.

    Some fisherman don’t think colors of a fly is that important. Others think it’s everything. Like A.K.Best. He’s a fanatic over colors and i’m told he’ll be catching fish when everybody else isn’t. So, he might be on to something. I’m sure the Brits felt the same way when developing the spiders. Use the proper color silk thread to tie proper spiders in the way they were designed to be made. If that’s not important then use the fake stuff.

    #7961

    Grsdlnr
    Spectator

    At least out here where the humidity is low, I wouldn’t worry too much about silk-tied flies rotting.

    I’m of the “color isn’t a big deal on dry flies” persuasion. Having the exact shade as the natural won’t hurt but size, silhouette and presentation are all far more vital. Wets are another story. I tie midge pupa with Naples silk bodies (amber, claret and java brown) and they work better than nylon thread versions often enough to justify tying them. Looking at the amber ones in particular, they look garishly bright when dry but wet they darken to a shade that must look right to a trout.

    Creek, do you still use real silk lines? I’ve cast a few and liked them but never took the plunge on one myself.

    #7962

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    Good to know, thanks creek.

    So when it comes to the color of the silk when wet, I guess this blows the silhouette theory out the window?

    I guess what’s important is going back to the root of it all, despite what all others say, and that’s using what works for you.
    We have had discussions on color before, and yes, in different depths different colors work better. In short I remember in 1 to 10 feet in depth, bright colors show better. I remember red was in that area of depth, but blue and purple can be seen better as blue and purple down deep. Deeper than any river we have here.
    So maybe I should keep in mind that fishing in water no deeper than 3ft. which is hip high to me, I should tie with brighter colors. But I just don’t see brightly colored bugs flying around. They are mostly gray, brown, black and tan, some a light greenish color.
    I’d rather keep it looking as natural as I can, but if throwing a splash of color on a fly like a hot spot, for example a red head on a dry fly, does any better, ok, I could see me doing something like that, and I have brought that topic up before.
    But a dry fly is not a wet fly, but is it seen in the same way to a trout? In other words, does it care if a dry is bright, but a spider is dull?
    Maybe I’ll do that just for a little bit of fun, tying dries with a red head. But then would that make an Adams an Adams still?

    When it comes to flies and tying them I have learned one thing, and it just hit me this second. It’s a bloody vicious circle on what is what and how it’s tied. Who the heck cares how my flies are tied and what colors I use? It should be nobody but me.

    Please, don’t anyone tell me the Earth is flat, I have enough to worry about. I wouldn’t believe you anyway.

    #7963

    Creek
    Spectator

    Of course, it’s flat. Look out your window. Flat right?

    Silk line on bamboo and a Cortland Peach on graphite Grsdlnr. Glass is usually the Peach.

    #7964

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    Grs, you snuck in on me, so I didn’t see your post. So with wets color is more important? Well, that makes things a lot easier.

    Whats the difference between Naples vs. Gossamer silk threads?

    #7965

    Grsdlnr
    Spectator

    Gossamer is quite a bit smaller in diameter.

    #7966

    Scotty MacFly
    Spectator

    I have not heard or seen Naples sold anywhere, only the Gossamer. Is there any advantages over Gossamer that Naples has, and am I using the wrong silk for spiders?

    #7967

    Grsdlnr
    Spectator

    I got mine from Golden Witch in PA – a bamboo rodmaking supplier. Their website says that their supplies of Pearsall’s silks are going fast (they may well be gone by now) Rodmakers went nuts for the stuff when Pearsall announced they were not going to be making any more.

    Either one is fine for spiders. Wrapping rods I used Naples for the main wrap and Gossamer for tipping – the smaller diameter means I can add an extra wrap or two and still get a nice narrow tip (silk is slippery stuff on a rod and even one more wrap helps to keep it from unraveling)

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