Senior fishing license

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  wheezeburnt 2 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #6405

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    I have a co- worker here who would like to know how old you have to be in CO to get the lifetime fishing license?

    Never mind.

    • This topic was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  Scotty MacFly.
    #6407

    wheezeburnt
    Participant

    I’m sure you got your answer, but it reminded me of a bit of an annoyance that affects me directly: my province, like so many jurisdictions, gives a discount of between 40 and 50% to anglers and hunters over 65. This is a unilateral discount; doesn’t matter if you have an income of 15,000 or 150,000. I appreciate that many retired (or hoping to be retired) folk, including a few here, are struggling with a very limited income, and these sorts of discounts are a real benefit. I have no problem with that. But there are plenty of us who, by good luck or good planning, are financially ok. On top of that, I can now hunt or fish almost any day the seasons are open, so the license is of greater value to me than at any other time in my life. Why should the young fellow up the road who struggles with a small, single income and three kids and gets to fish three times a year, pay full price while I walk or drive past his house on the way to the stream to fish 60+ times a year on my discounted license?

    I would happily continue to pay the standard fee for my licenses and have that discount passed on to folks whose income makes the purchase of a license a burden. I realize that some jurisdictions give FREE licenses to senior citizens, presumably as some sort of reward for having paid tax and contributed to society for several decades. I guess I’m one of those fools who believes that a long life is its own reward, and that during my peak taxpaying years I benefitted from those tax contributions via schools, roads, health care (sorry), police protection, environmental protection, game enforcement and, in my case from a civil service paycheck.
    My suggestion would be to let people submit their expired licenses as proof of a deduction at tax time, so that, if your income is below a certain threshold, you could deduct some portion of the fee from taxes owing.
    Just my opinion, of course, and I’m definitely open to hear what others think of this position.
    brent

    #6408

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    Brent, I really like your idea about deductions at tax time. You got my vote.

    It appears CO. no longer has the lifetime license. When you turn 64 it now costs $1.00 annual. I believe the DOW thinks the older you get, the less fishing you will do due to age issues. And I know it happens to some where the body can’t do things like it used to, but there are some who are in great shape in their 70’s. I hope I am one of those when I get there.

    But whose to say really on why they do what they do. It’s government, and I stay out of that stuff.

    But I still like your way of thinking Brent.

    #6409

    Creek
    Participant

    A tax break wouldn’t help me one bit. My only income is SS and I don’t even file taxes anymore. Got anymore suggestions? I still pay over $200 a year for hunting tags. I’ve been paying in to the DOW for fishing and hunting all my life. Way more than you guys added up together. You’re going to take away my free fishing license for a few years?

    Well, cheer up. the DOW is thinking of charging us again. Will that help you sleep better?

    #6410

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    That’s why I stay out of politics and government issues. I can’t keep up with it.

    In your case Creek, it wouldn’t help you and others in the same situation at all and that’s not fair to any of you. It wouldn’t work then. When it comes to breaks, I am totally believing our retired citizens get all the breaks first. No one should have to work all their life and lose it all due to injury, sickness, or being scammed out of it. I hate seeing good honest retirees have to come out of retirement just to pay medical bills. Nope, sorry Creek, you are right. You’d be loseing out if that happened and you would lose your fishing.

    I hear the DOW is still wanting to up the price. If they do, and with the # of days I can fish these days, a daily residential license is all I’ll pay. So pay as I go I guess.

    #6411

    Creek
    Participant

    Yes, they want to up the prices or all tags. I might not be able to hunt anymore if they do what they’re talking about. That would take away my source for meat. I don’t buy meat in a market anymore. Too expensive, so the meat from hunting is my only source for me and my dog. I won’t be a happy camper if that’s taken away.

    The few bucks I save on a fishing license helps. It all helps, but I feel I still pay my fair share. The fishing is low income for the DOW. Hunting is where they make the real money.
    A non resident moose tag is $2200. $250 for a resident.

    #6412

    wheezeburnt
    Participant

    Creek, my point is that folks like you SHOULD get all the breaks available, and you should probably have been getting them for a lot longer. Its an issue of ‘fairness’ vs ‘equality’. I’m saying that to treat all anglers and hunters equally is not ‘fair’. There are plenty of arguments around that someone who has plenty of resources must have worked hard and acted wisely to place themselves in that position and so should not be penalized for their good management. But anyone who has lived for a few decades with their eyes open realizes that this is not always (often) the case. Starting life behind the 8-ball, living under prejudice, falling ill, family members falling ill, being injured, being the victim of a failed industry or just plain government mismanagement can turn a charmed life into a nightmare.
    My personal experience has led me to conclude that system abusers are in the minority, and I am willing to accommodate a handful of undeserved heelers to ensure that the many disadvantaged are properly considered. I am woefully unqualified to comment on your state’s (or country’s) approach to such things, but it seems to me that anyone whose sole income is the inadequate amount that social security payments represent, should not lose a portion of that to participate in the harvest of the fish and wildlife resources that they, as citizens, jointly own.
    Your fees are very high. The MOST I can pay for an all-species fishing license is $26 Canadian, reduced to $10 for seniors. Moose is $72, reduced to $37 (licenses are issued via a draw); deer is $29 and $14. When I began work at DNR, trout permits (covers all species except atlantic salmon) were FREE. When we raised it to $5 to cover admin costs, you’d think we were collecting their first born male children.
    brent

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