Grsdlnr

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 264 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: I'm home #7796

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    Glad you’re back, Scotty.

    It saddens me to hear about violence and travel advisories to Mexico. I have nothing but good memories of my visits there (primarily Baja)

    in reply to: Degreasing leader and/or tippet #7792

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    I have a little squeeze bottle of something called Leader Sink – it’s a viscous clear liquid – you rub a drop between your thumb and forefinger and apply to the tippet. I never noticed that it made a difference. But it takes up so little space that I haven’t thrown it out either.

    YMMV.

    in reply to: Burping fish #7788

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    In mammals, lactic acid is a waste product produced by intense exercise. It builds up in the muscle tissue, causing fatigue and is removed by the oxygen in normal blood flow while at rest. Drinking a lot of water afterward is supposed to help flush the lactic acid from muscles as well. I would suppose it’s the same in fish after a hard fight. What they would need most is rest in well-oxygenated water.

    So the advice I always followed was to land a fish as quickly as possible (no, 7x is not more “sporting” dammit) keep it in the water (skip the #$@%& hero shots please!) and don’t C&R if the water is warm (less oxygen in warm water) Not sure how giving the fish a massage would do much good. I thought the idea was not to mess with the fish’s slime layer – that’s why we use rubber net bags instead of knotted cotton, right?

    I’d want to watch the video before forming an firm opinion on this.

    I’d never shoot game without eating it, but may be killing fish for just my own pleasure and not know it.

    Probably a few, but good C&R technique will minimize that. Since we rarely see dead fish I’d expect the overwhelming majority of released fish live. I know some Canadian salmon rivers have a limit on the number of fish one can land – either released or killed when you reach the limit you’re done for the day. Maybe not a bad idea on any heavily pressured river.

    in reply to: Burping fish #7784

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    Haven’t heard of that one. I’ve never caught an Atlantic but have landed many hundreds of steelhead and Pacific salmon – IMO like any fish the key to C&R survival is landing them quickly and releasing them with a minimum of handling. Maybe I’m missing something but this technique sounds like the exact opposite of minimal handling.

    in reply to: Educate me on the Sparkle Dun #7783

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    It’s a good bug. Made some for eastern sulfur hatches and they did OK. On really hammered streams I do better with CDC patterns, like Harrop’s various emergers and cripples, but definitely try a few SD’s. They’re easy enough to tie and (unlike CDC) reasonably durable too.

    in reply to: Hoppers – to foam or not to foam #7767

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    Same experience here Scotty – never did well with big hoppers. Even when the banks were crawling with 2” naturals only an imitation half that size or smaller would raise a fish.

    Big fan of the Dave’s Hopper but I’ll tie them with a yellow or green foam body instead of the poly yarn that the original pattern calls for. It struck me as a good compromise – Whitlock’s proven design plus the extra flotation of foam.

    I suspect the popularity of foam hoppers has more than a bit to do with their suitability as strike indicators. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. 😉

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 2 days ago by  Grsdlnr.
    in reply to: Hot spots #7758

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    … if the trout doesn’t notice, then why even add a bright color?

    Maybe they do – all the research I’ve read says that trout can see color, but HOW they see color is still a question. It’s possible their vision is more affected by UV and other parts of the spectrum we can’t see – to my knowledge nobody can say for certain. So maybe, at least in some circumstances, color on a dry can make a difference.

    Or perhaps we humans just fish more effectively with a fly we find attractive than one we find dull?

    in reply to: Hot spots #7754

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    Hatches were another thing I didn’t think of. I was only thinking about water conditions.

    And I wasn’t really thinking of attractor type flies. Where the idea is to get the fish to notice the fly in the first place, and maybe a bright spot of non-buggy color is just the ticket. You could certainly do it as an egg sac like the Female Adams or something else. I know George Harvey went to bright yellow or orange poly wings instead of wood duck flank on his Catskill type dries for visibility as he got older, and said that the trout didn’t notice the difference.

    I always figured that a fish sees the floating fly basically as a silhouette against the bright sky so color isn’t usually important (usually!) That’s why we catch so many fish on an Adams, even if the real bugs are tan or green or whatever.

    in reply to: Hot spots #7746

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    Of course it’s worth a try.

    My own experience is that color on a dry is the least important factor – size and silhouette are vital, but
    I’ve have caught plenty of fish during a hatch with the “wrong” color fly (like an Adams taken for a Hendrickson, the males are reddish brown and the females a pinkish tan – neither one close to medium gray) But we have little information on how a fish really sees color, so go for it – no experiment is a failure if you learn something.

    in reply to: These new fangled fly boxes #7743

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    From the pictures they look OK. I’ve used compartment boxes forever, and to replace them all now with those new ones would run about what a couple of good necks would cost.

    in reply to: Not important, just need to vent. #7730

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    Very short-sighted management you’re working for, Scotty. All too typical these days, I’m afraid.

    Update your CV and find someplace better my friend.

    in reply to: Abel's Cash reel #7725

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    Not that I’m in the market for an Abel reel anyway but no thanks. It’s hard to imagine even a hardcore Johnny Cash fan wanting one of those.

    in reply to: Just a word….or two #7712

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    Thank you, and the merriest of holidays to you as well.

    in reply to: Hackle size #7705

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    CDC softhackles,eh?

    cdcsofthackle2

    in reply to: Hackle size #7693

    Grsdlnr
    Participant

    I’ve never owned a hackle gauge. Checking a hackle against the hook gap always worked well enough for me. As long as it looks good, it’s good.

    About the only hackled mayfly pattern I tie anymore is Rene Harrop’s Hairwing Dun (though I prefer the look of a biot body to the original dubbed one) Since the hackle is trimmed on the bottom to make the fly sit lower in the water, a hackle about 1X the hook gap works fine.

    On the relatively few standard hackled patterns I still tie, it really depends on where they’re going to be used – rough water flies like Wulffs need longer hackle.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 264 total)