Scotty MacFly

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 759 total)
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  • in reply to: I'm home #7799

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    That sounds 100 times better than why I was there. Glad you had fun.

    in reply to: I'm home #7797

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    Baja sounds like a tropical vacation with beaches and fruity drinks with umbrellas sticking out of them. I was in Chihuahua where it’s in the desert and it looks like the middle east.

    in reply to: I'm home #7795

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    Thanks buddy.

    in reply to: Burping fish #7785

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    After bringing the fish in, he would always keep it in the water, that’s one of the things I admire about the host. He would just slide his hand back & forth to get this gas build up out of the fish. He said that it helps with the fish survival way after the release. I read that human during a vigorous workout also builds a lacto gas.
    He said many times after a hard fight the angler will just release the fish and it will swim off strong, only to die a few hours later because the angler didn’t push this gas out.

    It is very similar to what creek said about tickling the fish. I read up on that, but that is done for a different reason.

    in reply to: Educate me on the Sparkle Dun #7782

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    I have not fished or tied that fly. But I have heard many good things about it.
    I say go for it, what do you have to lose?

    in reply to: Burping fish #7779

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    I have a few episodes recorded. When I get back from Chihuahua this weekend I’ll watch them. I remember Andre, the host, explaining why he does that. So if I have that episode, I will post why.

    in reply to: Burping fish #7777

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    I can’t find anything on it. But I think its a lactade gas they build up fighting to get off. It will kill the fish if not pushed out.

    in reply to: Burping fish #7776

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    No Creek. I mean before he releases the fish. I first noticed it on a show called King of the River, where the host rubs the belly of the Atlantic Salmon to get some kind of gas out of the fish that it builds up during the fight.
    I have seen others do it on t.v. before releasing big trout as well.

    in reply to: Hoppers – to foam or not to foam #7769

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    Grs, I am so glad to know I’m not the only one who doesn’t do well with big hoppers. I have had fish slap at them when used as a indicator, and then take my smaller fly. I can only come up with the reasoning that there must be some micro drag, so they slap the hopper, and in turn slowing the drift down enough that they take my trailing fly. But I’m not certain of that yet 100%.

    in reply to: Hoppers – to foam or not to foam #7766

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    It’s called the Charlie Boy Hopper, which is a foam hopper.

    in reply to: These new fangled fly boxes #7765

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    Thanks Mike, that does actually help.

    in reply to: Hot spots #7764

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    I’m going to tie a few when I get back from Mexico. I figured I’d tie a hot spot at the tail end on some, and on others at the head. I may even tie a hot spot right behind the hackle collar.

    I figure why not, what could it hurt?

    in reply to: Hoppers – to foam or not to foam #7763

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    Wow, uh, good question. You know, in my experience, from what I have witnessed as well, some people love foam hoppers, and some others really like Dave’s Hoppers. I personally like the look of Dave’s & have a few myself, but I have found with Dave’s, don’t go too big. About 3/4 of an inch is as big as I’ll go. Anything bigger I have not caught a fish yet.

    I say, stick with what works for you, but try another pattern once in awhile just to see how it goes.
    Like the saying goes, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

    All the fly patterns I tie, which ain’t many, are proven producers. I’m happy with that.

    So if foam doesn’t work for you, don’t waste your time I say.

    Personally, I know all the magazines go crazy with hopper articles for summer & fall, and people love to fish them. I never really had any great success with hoppers, so I began to use them as an indicator when I have a very small dry trailing behind that I can’t see very well fishing riffles & such. But I also feel the authors of those magazine articles will write anything just to get paid.

    I know there is a hopper pattern used on the Rio Grande near South Fork CO. that gets rave reviews, and I have wondered maybe some patterns work better in certain areas than other patterns. I can’t remember the pattern they use down on the Rio, but I’ll look it up & let you know.

    in reply to: Hot spots #7759

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    The color spectrum under water is different. I red articles how for example blues & blacks & purples will stay pretty much the same as a lure gets deeper. Red & orange stay that color pretty shallow, but change as a red or orange lure gets deeper.

    So fish can see color, but what I’m getting is, its not so much the wings or posts that a fish cares about color wise, because they see the bottom of the fly, so shape & size is what’s important. So really a hot spot on a dry isn’t needed, but it doesn’t hurt either. Wings & posts brightly colored are for our benefit of seeing the fly.

    Ok, I’m starting to get it & understand.

    in reply to: Hot spots #7755

    Scotty MacFly
    Participant

    GRS, if the trout doesn’t notice, then why even add a bright color? My grandfather would agree with you that a dry is only a silhouette, but he believed no matter what color the bugs were, they looked similar in color from below, with some small differences depending on the brightness of the color. He said something like, and I may be wrong on this, but looking at a fly in a glass of water from the bottom of the glass, like a trout looking up to the fly, is different than the same fly floating on the surface of the stream, because of the lighting plus the shadows, and clarity of the water.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 759 total)